Innovation on Mango

1

Indian tree spurge (Euphorbia tirucalli) to protect mango (Mangifera indica) from the root affecting diease of sukaro.
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : Naranbhai Paragbhai Sarvalia from the Sayala village of Sayala taluka in the Surendranagar district of Gujarat suggests to plant Indian tree spurge (Euphorbia tirucalli) to protect mango (Mangifera indica) from the root affecting diease of sukaro. Plant two feet long transplants of Indiantree spurge (Euphorbia tirucalli) around mango (Mangifera indica) to protect it from the root affecting diease of sukaro. Due to this method the roots of the mango tree are rendered safe.
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2

Early flowering and fruiting in mango tree
Country: India
Category: Production
Innovation Detail : A quarter to one feet pieces of alangium (Alangium salvifolium) and organic manure are layered on each other for three to four times in trench and compost is ready after 8 months of buried. This compost is layered, around the trunk of mango (Mangifera indica) tree. It will induce early flowering and fruiting in mango tree. This is a traditional practice learnt from forefathers.
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3

Planting holy basil (Ocimum sanctum) under mango (Mangifera indica) tree to control the insects.
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : Nareshbhai Chaudhary from Gujarat believes in biodiversity. To prevent all kinds of insect attack on mango (Mangifera indica) crop, he employs a simple method. He grows a couple of holy basil (Ocimum sanctum) plants underneath each tree. Due to this, insects like aphid, whitefly, jassid, fruit fly and other do not attack the mango tree but instead frequent the basil plants. As the basil attracts all kinds of insects, Nareshbhai sprays insecticide on these plants and thus saves the mango crop from insect infestation. He sprays the insecticide only in the morning for maximum benefit. Nareshbhai got the idea of using this method during discussions with village elders and farmers. and then employed on his mango orchard. (This practice was rechecked by Abdulla Pathan in May 2004)
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4

Use of bastard teak (Butea monosperma) leaves for saving mango (Mangifera indica) fruits from patches due to exposure to sun.
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : Summer is the season of arrival of luscious mango (Mangifera indica) fruits in market. Kesar variety of mango grown in the Saurashtra region of Gujarat is known worldwide for its taste and smell. The mango season coincides with the scorching summer. When the mangoes are in ripening stage, direct sunlight burn the fruits and this results in burn patches on the fruits. To protect the mango fruits from heat and to prevent patch forming, orchard farmer Tulsibhai Jivanbhai from Bhavnagar district of Gujarat has a very simple solution. He covers the mango fruits with rolled up bastard teak (Butea monosperma) leaves. As the bastard teak leaves are large, these cover the whole fruit. Tulsibhai has experienced that this method gives 60% protection to his mango crop.
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5

Uses snuff made from tobacco (Nicotina tabacum) as well as its pungent leaves to prevent powdery mildew on mango (Mangifera indica) crop.
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : Rajnikant Kelabhai Patel of Gujarat uses the pungent tobacco (Nicotina tabacum) leaves as well as snuff made from its leaves and sand to control powdery mildew on the mango crop. He takes one kilogram of tobacco (Nicotina tabacum) leaves and snuff and adds these to five kilogram of moist sand. If the sand is dry then it should be moisoned. He sprays the herbal granules on the mango (Mangifera indica) crop as soon as flowering takes place. The tobacco-spraying must be done before the mango crop is affected by powdery mildew (chara).
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6

Control of Flower Dropping, Ergot and Wilt in Mango
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : Leaves of eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) and mango (Mangifera indica) are burnt to create smoke below mango tree to control ergot, wilt and flower dropping.
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7

Use the oil cake of neem (Azadirachta indica) seed for the treatment of root rot disease in mango.
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : When mango trees are hit by root rot (called "talkidi" in Gujarati), spread the oil cake of neem (Azadirachta indica) seed around the root. One tree needs one-kilo oil cake. The oil cake is spread only when the tree is affected by the disease. Within two to three days, the beneficial results of the treatment can be seen. There is no harmful effect. Root rot is cured by the oil cake. This is an ancient method. This method is easy to use.
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8

Cure for Barren Mango Tree
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : If the mango (Mangifera indica) tree does not give fruit even after being fully grown, then the people have a seemingly unscientific but effective method to make the tree bear fruit. This faith borders on the superstition of the people who tie up ribbons, threads, artificial jewellery, pots and so on on big trees such as banyan near pilgrim places. In the specific case of mango, the pilgrims progress fructifies whatever the scientific reason behind it. Dayabhai Valabhai Vankar simply leaves 7 kilogram to 8 kilogram bran bundles of wheat (Triticum aestivum) tied up in a well-arranged manner on the mango branches. Lo and behold! the mango tree starts bearing fruit. How the bran acts on the branch is not clear. But it does act, going by the peoples unshakeable faith in the practice. Most of the mango producers of the Kuredi area in Sabarkantha district follow this method faithfully. However, Dayabhai cuations that the bran bundles should be so perfectly arranged on the branches that the bran does not spill and scatter. This would indeed remove barrenness of mango tree. "Underneath the mango tree..." as the English film song of yore goes, the fruiterer may soon have to stand and admire the crop in season. Apparently, it is a question of choice of the mango variety, of which there are hundreds. There are some fast-growing mango trees that in a shrub-like stage itself yield fruit that touch the ground pulling the branches down. Some of the smug native varieties obviously need to be coaxed with votive offerings such as bran bundles placed on branches to yield the luscious and delicious fruit.
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9

Pyramidal Saving of Mango
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : Dhirubhai Bhumabhai Naik of Gujarat takes to geometry to prevent his mango crop. In doing so, he goes beyond the the Pythagorean theorem. First he says the pyramid is a combination of four triangles: No dispute about that if one takes a three-dimensional view. What is difficult to gulp like a raw mango is his construction of triangles, which is a bit obtuse. He constructs his cardboard pyramid as follows: A pyramid is effective that if the length of the base of the pyramid is x, then the two sides can be taken 19-20x. For example, if the base is 10 centimetres, then the two sides of the pyramid will be 19-20 x10-9.5. Hence the three sides of the triangle become 10 x 9.5 x 9.5. Such a pyramid can be made from cardboard, wood or cement. Around the trees of mango (Mangifera indica) and sapota (Achras zapota), four pyramids are placed. These should be placed in such a manner that sunrays fall directly on the pyramid. This has two benefits: One the crop is protected from direct sunrays and, two, nitrogen becomes available. And fertilizers containing nitrogen are costly. The pyramid is a double benefit all right. How the much-needed nitrogen, available in plenty in nature in a different form, becomes available in the cardboard pyramidal method is obviously a complex question. In fact, it perhaps answers the pyramidal question why the ancient Egyptians constructed the pyramids in the first place. However, Dirubhai is concerned with saving his mango crop. If it serves the purpose of saving his mango inflorescence that is good enough for him. If the cardboard pyramid helps form organic fertilizer the better. The pyramidal question is pure speculation, better left to Egyptologists who have not yet deciphered hieroglyphs. If one understands nature like Dirubhai does and mould the understanding into ones benefit and for the benefit of ones fellowmen, like supplying them with luscious and delicious mangoes, it is serving the greater purpose all right.
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10

Growing of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) to protect mango (Mangifera indica) seedlings
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : Before the actual planting of the mango (Mangifera indica) trees during the monsoon season, the young seedlings are first prepared either from the stone of the mango fruits or from cuttings from mango trees. At this time there is a high prevalence of heat and dryness due to which the growth and development of seedling is hindered and many of them wither. The young seedlings are also vulnerable to the pest and disease attacks. To protect the young seedlings at this vulnerable stage and for better growth and development, local variety of pigeon pea is planted along the southern and the western edges of the nursery. The pigeon peas provide shade to the mango seedling and increase the humidity of the soil by protecting it from the hot dry winds that blow at this time of the year. They also produce a rich harvest of pigeon pea which can be sold in the market. The pigeon pea crop remains for two years and by maintaining it in the field for five years the young seedlings of mango tree are grown into healthy trees that can withstand stress. The pigeon pea can be harvested twice and the crop also protects the mango trees. This practice is self developed by the farmer. Earlier when he was not growing the pigeon pea out of 50 seedlings only 20 seedlings attained maturity. After he started growing pigeon pea none of the seedlings withered. If pigeon pea is not planted 30 plants of mango fails to grow and the farmer has to replant the vacant spots and as a result the replanted mango trees develop and mature late and also this involves the heavy labour. When mango plant has been grown from cuttings, the cost of one cutting ranges from 40 to 120 rupees and if the mango seedling fails, the farmer has to face heavy financial loss. Therefore planting of pigeon pea gives high economic advantage to the farmer. This practice has been learnt from fore-fathers and also from the knowledge of preparing live hedges of cactus around young seedlings to protect them. Use of pigeon pea as a protective fence is recommended by all farmers of the region.
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11

Induce Early Flowering and Fruiting in Mango
Country: India
Category: Production
Innovation Detail : Cut the leaves and branches of ankota (Alangium salvifolium) plant into roughly one-foot-long pieces. Then after making one layer of organic manure, place the ankota pieces over it. Prepare three to four alternating layers of organic manure and ankota like this. Close the manure pit from the top with soil. Leave it for 8 months, after which the manure will be ready for use. When the manure is ready, apply it around the mango tree by making a basin around the tree and filling it with this manure. This will induce early flowering and fruiting. As the ripened mangos become available for sale early, they will fetch better prices to the farmer. This technique was developed by the farmer himself and has been found to be very effective.
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12

Growing black basil (Ocimum sanctum) in mango orchards as protection against insect pests like jassid and aphid.
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : Insects like aphid, jassid and fruit fly attack mango (Mangifera indica) trees when they are flowering or fruiting. These insects suck the juice from fruits, flowers and leaves and can bring about severe losses to farmers. Farmers have learnt by experience that these insects can be brought under control by growing black basil (Mangifera indica) beneath the mango trees. Insects like aphid, jassid and fruit fly are strongly attracted by the aroma of the basil bush and settle on it in preference to the mango tree and can be got rid of by spraying any insecticide on the basil bushes. It is possible to destroy 70 per cent of the insects in this way. This method has several advantages. Insecticides need only be sprayed on the basil bushes, which means less of costly insecticides is needs. Further, the mango fruits are not contaminated by harmful chemicals.
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13

Use of coarse grain (Paspalum scrobiculatum) and groundnut oil to induce flowering in mango tree.
Country: India
Category: Production
Innovation Detail : During the monsoon, place a bundle of kodo milllet (Pasupalum scrobiculatum) on the mango tree (Mangifera indica). Pour groundnut oil over it. Then make a ring around the trunk of the tree by removing the outer covering. Due to rain, water falls on the kodo millet bundle and goes to the roots. Flowering will occur in the summer under this method. An alternative method is to cut down one root branch.
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14

Use of tall variety of mango (Mangifera indica) for swine infestation in mango crop.
Country: India
Category: Crop Management
Innovation Detail : Generally, the orchards of fruit crop, which are located near the jungle gets damaged by swines and other animals. At night time, they make the destruction in mangoes (Mangifera indica), guavas (Psidium guajava) and various other crops. Particularly they make infestation in the grafted mangoes as the plant is midget. To cure this problem, a good variety of mango plants are planted without grafting. As the height of these varieties are much higher as compared to the normal height of grafted mangoes. Hence, swines cannot reach and destruct the fruits of these plants. Thus, the mango crop is saved of the problem.
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15

Use of leaves of golden shower (Cassia fistula) and bustard teak (Butea monosperma) and smoke for ripening and storage of mango (Mangifera indica)
Country: India
Category: Post Harvest
Innovation Detail : Leaves of golden shower (Cassia fistula) are spread uniformly in a basket and fruits are placed and then tied. This process maintains the internal temperature and in four to seven days fruits are get ripen. Leaves of bastard teak (Butea monosperma) can also be used instead of bustard leaves. It is a traditional practice.
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